Friday, July 29, 2016

Women Love Diamonds Episode 3

It has been a while since we posted any updates about the massive restoration project that is the Women Love Diamonds poster. So, a quick recap: Last summer the poster was literally in pieces and missing a very large chunk right in the middle.



John and Madalyn went through multiple steps to get the poster linen backed and then prepped so restoration could begin. (All of which you can read in detail in Part 1 and Part 2.)


The main issue we encountered with this poster, besides the fact that it was originally in shreds, was that as far as we can tell it is a one of a kind poster and thus no reference exists for us to base our restoration off of. This is just the kind of challenge that we love at Poster Mountain! Ravi, Gabe and John had a quick consultation and decided to base the restoration of our leading lady's dress off of stills from the movie and other dresses from that time period.

Before restoration. 

At the end of Episode 2, Ravi had gotten a basic outline of  our leading lady Pauline Starke's body. The next step was to begin to give the dress shape. 


In order to get the dress just right and to connect the top half to the lower portion, Ravi drew a simple sketch of Starke's form. 


Ravi spent a lot of time looking at stills from this silent movie, although most of them were of Starke sitting down, so he had to get creative with how the dress probably looked.


I promise, Ravi really is working here not just surfing the net. 
Once Ravi had a good idea of what the dress may have looked like, it was time to get to work and connect the upper half to the lower train of the dress.


"Don't mind me, Ravi, I'm just lurking and watching you draw so I can take photos."

Preliminary drawing done!

This was one of the most incredible transformations to watch. Ravi worked on it when he had a free hour or two in between other projects and every time I looked up or went over to take a photo he had added more detail.


Here the background is masked off to protect it from the airbrushing that Ravi used to put in base coats of color.

After he had the outline of all the lines of the dress, Ravi masked off the rest of the poster and began to airbrush in a base coat. This color blended in with the original color of the dress and softened the lines of his pencil drawing, allowing him to add in more layers of color and pigment that would recreate the look of the original poster. 


Here is a close up of the preliminary sketch and the first round of airbrushing.

Base coat of color is in!

I had hoped to finish up Women Love Diamonds this week, but the post was just too long! So we'll have one last update next week! 

Certain proprietary steps and procedures have been omitted. If you have any comments or ideas for things you would like to see us cover on our blog, please let us know! Additional questions regarding other work or your pieces, please contact us via email at postermount@aol.com or by phone 818.882.1214.

Also, check out our websites: http://www.postermountain.com and http://www.lapapergroup.com. Please feel free to leave comments or questions on the blog. For dail photos and updates check out Poser Mountain's Twitter and Instragra: follus us on Twitter @postermount and postermountain on Instragram. Our subsidiary company, LA Paper Group will be showcasing the fine art side of the company: @LAPaperGroup on Twitter and LAPaperGroup on Instagram.

Friday, July 22, 2016

Cacao... Coco... Chocolate! (Part 3)


This is the last part in our Cacao series! Part 2 ended with all the borders being replaced and all the holes in the poster filled.



Restoration is the final step and is often the most time consuming. This poster needed at least five different colors airbrushed, which also means five different masks. Pete got to work, laboriously covering up or opening up areas using a low tack tape, acetate, frisket and misket. He has quite the arsenal of tools!



Unfortunately, I don't have a photo of Aaron in action during airbrushing. However, his work speaks for itself. Pictured below are before and afters of several of the layers of colors he was working on.


It's been a while now, but I think this is the border was the final area that was airbrushed. 
After airbrushing, the boys (excuse me, men) with all the colored pencils get to work filling in all the small details that make a good poster. My favorite photos of Gabe were when he was working on the longitudes and latitudes of the globe.



The final step was to put the original printing house's information in, which had been partially trimmed away at some point. In order to do this Gabe first found the correct information and then scaled it to the appropriate size before he and John silk screened it back on the border.

  


Just as a reminder here is what the poster looked like before we began work:


After several weeks of work, here is the finished poster:


Voila! Fully restored poster!

Next week we will do our final post about the Women Love Diamonds poster!

Certain proprietary steps and procedures have been omitted. If you have any comments or ideas for things you would like to see us cover on our blog, please let us know! Additional questions regarding other work or your pieces, please contact us via email at postermount@aol.com or by phone 818.882.1214.

Also, check out our websites: http://www.postermountain.com and http://www.lapapergroup.com. Please feel free to leave comments or questions on the blog. For dail photos and updates check out Poser Mountain's Twitter and Instragra: follus us on Twitter @postermount and postermountain on Instragram. Our subsidiary company, LA Paper Group will be showcasing the fine art side of the company: @LAPaperGroup on Twitter and LAPaperGroup on Instagram.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

A quick update!

We've been busy the last month! I always have good intentions of putting up short weekly updates of what we're working on to tide you over until we have time for a longer post, however I have not lived up to my intentions. But I'm going to get better! Starting with this week.

We've had several large scale projects that we've been working on, but the most interesting and time consuming is probably a Sarah Bernhardt poster designed by Alfonse Mucha. We have done quite a few of these over the years, so we're not going to do a start to finish post. However, I will put up some process photos and eventually a final photo when we are done.

This particular poster is owned by our friends over in the UK at AntikBar. Their website is worth checking out and they recently opened up a brick and mortar shop in London, so if you're over there stop by to see what they have. And in a few months this poster will probably be available!


As John likes to say, this poster was well loved. It was mounted, but that previous backing was in just as bad a shape as the poster. Sorry, I only have a good photo of after we demounted it and then relined it so that it was stable again.  


We will have poured several hundred hours of labor and love into this poster by the end. One particular labor that is just barely visible is redrawing by hand the text at the top of the poster.


We've also begun airbrushing, starting with the leaves of the flowers.

So, that's all we've got for now! Next week we will be finishing our series on the French Cacao poster.

Don't forget to check out our websites:  http://www.postermountain.com and http://www.lapapergroup.com. Please feel free to leave comments or questions on the blog. For dail photos and updates check out Poser Mountain's Twitter and Instragra: follus us on Twitter @postermount and postermountain on Instragram. Our subsidiary company, LA Paper Group will be showcasing the fine art side of the company: @LAPaperGroup on Twitter and LAPaperGroup on Instagram.

Friday, May 20, 2016

Cacao... Coco... Chocolate! (Part 2)

Part 1 of this series finished with the old backing being removed from an early 20th Century French Cacao poster. After taking the backing off we washed the poster again to try to remove as much of the leftover adhesive as possible. Then it was again put through the isinglass gelatin process and left to dry face down on a board overnight.   

John and Ravi moving the large and heavy melamine board over to the shelves so it can dry overnight. 

There was still a thin layer of adhesive remaining on the back of the poster. John used a fine grit sand paper to remove this last layer of glue.

John checking and sanding down any uneveness leftover from the remaining adhesive.


Next, the poster was removed from the board with the hollytex facing still on the front. The poster was then washed one last time before glue was applied to the back and it was mounted to masa and linen.

John washing the poster and hollytex for a final time.

After applying glue to the back of the poster its time to linen back it so it will last another 100 years.

John and Robin linen backing the poster (while it still has the hollytex facing on). 

After the poster had dried for a few days we removed the facing.


The next step was prep. During the demounting process Robin and I saved a few of the larger pieces of the poster that came off along with the old backing. I was able to save some, but not all of these, and to put them back onto the poster where they belonged.

Bits and pieces of the poster that tore off during the demounting process. Some of them I was able to save, others were just too stuck.

In addition to the obvious holes, we were also adding borders back in. Putting borders back is one of my favorite prep projects, although it is time-consuming. Often when we are adding in borders we first have to determine if we have straight edges to base our measurements off of or if we need to use the image/printing to get the dimensions that the poster is supposed to be. Fortunately for this piece we did have relatively straight edges that we could use.


I traced out the borders, then began to look for paper that was similar in color, thickness, and style. However, one of the issues that we encountered with this poster was the poster paper itself. French commercial printing paper from the early 20th century is very thin. Think newsprint thin. So in the large areas, like the borders or the big hole in the globe, we used paper patches. However, other areas were so thin that paper patches weren't going to look good once restoration was started. We used a compound filler for these holes. It is white, so it is difficult to see in photos.

Tracing out the borders.


This is the pile of vintage paper that I thought might work and was sorting through to find the most appropriate.

This photo was taken after the borders were added back, but before the rest of the damage was filled.

After a few days of work, we had borders and all the cracks and holes were filled. Next week's post will be about the restoration of the poster.

A process photo after prep and before restoration.

Certain proprietary steps and procedures have been omitted. If you have any comments or ideas for things you would like to see us cover on our blog, please let us know! Additional questions regarding other work or your pieces, please contact us via email at postermount@aol.com or by phone 818.882.1214.

Also, check out our websites: http://www.postermountain.com and http://www.lapapergroup.com. Please feel free to leave comments or questions on the blog. For dail photos and updates check out Poser Mountain's Twitter and Instragra: follus us on Twitter @postermount and postermountain on Instragram. Our subsidiary company, LA Paper Group will be showcasing the fine art side of the company: @LAPaperGroup on Twitter and LAPaperGroup on Instagram.

Friday, May 13, 2016

Cacao... Coco... Chocolate! (Part 1)

Our next series of blog posts will feature the conservation and restoration of a vintage poster for one of  France's oldest chocolate brands: Le Cacao Poulain, which translates into English as the Chocolate Colt. (The icon of this company is usually a jumping colt  and appears to play off of  founder Victor-August Poulain's last name.) 

The vintage poster our client brought us dates from the late 19th century.  It was mounted to a foam core board and had some previous restoration. 

Before

Step 1 was to get the poster off the board or more accurately get the board off the poster. John and Jairo began by chipping away at the board, layer by layer. 



Once the board was off the poster there were still several additional layers to remove. The linen that the poster was on was also mounted to Chartex, which is a fabric lining applied with a heat activated wax-based adhesive. We first removed the Chartex, using a heat gun, iron and some will power.   



We then moved the poster over to our mounting tables, wet both the front and the back then applied a hollytex facing using our isinglass gelatin process. The facing would temporarily adhere to the front of the poster, keeping it relatively stable while we removed the linen from the back.





Watching John manipulate posters and art on our tables is one of the coolest things to see! 

This is a layer of hollytex, a gas permeable paper, that has been placed on the front of the poster to act as support while we demount it. 


Here John is applying the isinglass gelatin to the hollytex and allowing it to soak through to the poster.


After the facing was applied to the front the poster was flipped over so that the back was exposed. It was temporarily mounted to a large melamine board for increased stability.


The poster is now face down with the hollytex acting as a supporting layer between the poster and the melamine board.

We placed smaller sheets of hollytext on top so that the poster could "stew" for a while. Letting the poster sit allowed moisture to penetrate through the various layers and hopefully make it easier for us to take the final layer of the previous backing off. Turns out this was a big hope.

Smaller sheets of hollytext were applied so that we could work on parts of the poster while keep other parts damp. 


I have helped John and Robin demount a number of posters and fine art pieces. It is always a tough, time-consuming project no matter what. However, I don't think any of us have ever cursed so much as we did with this poster. The paper and ink were very fragile and the adhesive was very stubborn, so while we were able to save the vast majority of the poster we did lose some areas (paper and ink loss is always a risk with demounting posters).

After washing, gelatin treatment and then waiting, we tested this corner to see how easily the linen would come off.  
For most demount projects, particularly those that have been backed before conservation became more prevalent, we take the backing off in small strips. This allows us a certain amount of control and to find and handle problem areas. With this poster, there were problem areas all over the place!

We usually work from the middle out. The borders of a poster are usually the most fragile and benefit from extra time curing. 

Here Robin was able to remove most of this strip of linen in one long thin piece.



However, we handled it like the professionals we are.

We had the most trouble around the globe in the middle, but this was the last piece of the old backing! 

The poster after all the old (gross) linen was removed.


Next week's blog is about re-linen backing this poster!

Certain proprietary steps and procedures have been omitted. If you have any comments or ideas for things you would like to see us cover on our blog, please let us know! Additional questions regarding other work or your pieces, please contact us via email at postermount@aol.com or by phone 818.882.1214.

Also, check out our websites: http://www.postermountain.com and http://www.lapapergroup.com. Please feel free to leave comments or questions on the blog. For dail photos and updates check out Poser Mountain's Twitter and Instragra: follus us on Twitter @postermount and postermountain on Instragram. Our subsidiary company, LA Paper Group will be showcasing the fine art side of the company: @LAPaperGroup on Twitter and LAPaperGroup on Instagram.